Get Involved in the National Week of Making

The National Week of Making is quickly approaching! We are one month away from the June 17th kick-off! There are plenty of ways you can get involved.

Learn about the National Week of MakingPhoto of White House made of Lego blocks

Webinars are being held to provide information about the National Week of Making. The next webinar is being held on Thursday, May 19, at 12:00 pm Eastern Time. If you are not able to make that session, there will be an additional webinar next week. Registration links are provided below:

Webinar Schedule (all times Eastern):

Make a commitment

Let the White House know what new actions, commitments, or other activities you or your organization might be considering by going to the Nation of Makers website and submitting your information on the “What are you making?” form.

Nominate a Champion of Change

If you know someone who has had a significant impact on moving Making forward, you can nominate them as a Champion of Change. As part of the National Week of Making, the White House will be sharing stories of the countless leaders, innovators, entrepreneurs, and educators who work daily within their local communities across the country. The Administration wants your help to identify Champions of Change who are working to make advances in technology, platforms, educational opportunities, or spaces that empower even more Americans to become tinkerers, inventors, and entrepreneurs.

Nominations must be submitted by Wednesday May 18, 2016 (it just takes 5 minutes). You can read more about the call for nominations on the White House Blog and submit nominations at https://www.whitehouse.gov/champions.

Learn about the CTE Makeover Challenge

OCTAE launched the CTE Makeover Challenge to encourage more makerspaces in high schools. Contact your local high school to see if they were one of the more than 600 schools that entered the Challenge. You can learn more information about the Challenge at CTEMakeoverChallenge.com. The CTE Makeover Bootcamp phase of the Challenge will be concluding on May 22 when schools will submit Blueprints for their makerspaces. Stay tuned on #CTEMakeover.

Local activities

We are looking forward to the National Week of Making and invite you to join forces with us from June 17th through the 23rd and get involved in your local community. Here are a few ways folks in the maker community are already active:

  • Posting photos using #NationOfMakers to show your latest creation and share news about your events.
  • Organizing an event and/or hosting an open house at your local school, library, rec center, makerspace or set up a hangout online to connect and share your inventions with Makers across the country. Some have posted their events on a community website such as weekofmaking.org
  • Volunteering to be a mentor for someone who is interested in learning a new skill or find a mentor who would be interested in teaching a new skill you’ve been wanting to learn for a while.
  • Organizing a maker roundtable, maker town hall, or maker tour to convene thought leaders and decision makers in your community. (See what was done in Cleveland.)
  • Your brilliant idea here!

Stay updated

More information about the National Week of Making, National Maker Faire, and Making can be found on the following websites, and share your thoughts and ideas using the following hashtags.

Engaging in STEM Where We Live

Some public housing authorities (PHAs) are at the forefront of communities that are adopting place-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) initiatives, involving family members from preschoolers to adults, and creating opportunities to learn that are life-wide and lifelong.

Increasing exposure to and engagement in STEM learning outside of formal classroom settings is increasingly viewed as key to turning on more young people to STEM studies, and to addressing the equity gaps between high- and low-resourced families, schools, and communities. Recently the Department of Education released a Dear Colleague Letter to help state and local education agencies and their partners better understand how to use Federal funds to support innovative STEM education strategies to address equity goals.

The PHAs featured here, representing over 31,091 residents, with an average household income of $11,109, are part of communities participating in the SEED (STEM, Energy and Economic Development) initiative, supported in part by the Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Education (ED), and Energy (DOE). See a previous blog on the SEED sites.  In a three month period last fall, these PHAs have documented 138 STEM-related activities and training that have reached over 1,200 residents.

Read More

New Cybersecurity Education Funding Opportunity

A new funding opportunity was announced by the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) to establish state or regional consortia to identify cybersecurity workforce development pathways that address local workforce needs. The goal of these Regional Alliances and Multistakeholder Partnerships to Stimulate (RAMPS) Cybersecurity Education and Workforce Development awards is to enhance and create partnerships of employers, schools, and community organizations that focus on cybersecurity skill shortages within a local or regional economy. The program provides an opportunity for secondary and postsecondary educational institutions to help meet the growing need for cybersecurity professionals.

The program supports the President’s job-driven Ready to Work Initiative and focuses on the critical national need to build a high quality cybersecurity workforce.

A webinar will be held on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time to provide general information regarding this opportunity, offer general guidance on preparing applications, and answer questions. The grant is being funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

Key dates

(all times Eastern Time)
Application Open Date: Wednesday, May 11, 2106
Informational Webinar: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 11:00 a.m.
Application Deadline: Tuesday, July 12, 2016, by 11:59 p.m.

Links to more information

Guidance Released on Ability to Benefit Pell Eligibility

Federal Student Aid (FSA) office released guidance on Pell grant eligibility for students without a high school diploma (or its recognized equivalent) who are enrolled in career pathways. This Pell eligibility category, also known as Ability to Benefit,  was partially restored in December 2014 and through amendments passed in December of 2015.

FSA provides in the new guidance clarification of an eligible career pathway program and implementation information for the new provisions. The definition of career pathways in the guidance is aligned to that in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

See the statement posted by FSA, which links to the Dear Colleague Letter and Questions and Answers on implementation.

Partnerships Advance Correctional and Reentry Education

The U.S. Department of Justice, in conjunction with other federal agencies, just concluded National Reentry Week.  This was a cross-agency effort geared towards collaboration around helping incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals reenter and reintegrate with society. Reentry Week highlights included a proposed rule by the Office of Personnel Management to “ban the box” in federal hiring and a roadmap to reentry released by the Bureau of Prisons to assist federal inmates with reentry, guided by evidence based practices and principles.

Federal efforts to support reentry are not just limited to one week out of the year. One of the hallmarks of the Obama administration has been cross-agency collaboration to address collateral consequences of justice involvement. The Federal Interagency Reentry Council, the Improved Reentry Education and Promoting Reentry Success Through the Continuity of Educational Opportunities grant programs, and joint Department of Justice and Department of Education guidance around correctional education are just a few examples of successful, meaningful, and impactful collaborations.

Beyond the Box image of Checkbox

Image from Beyond the Box resource guide

The Department of Education has also released a “Beyond the Box” resource guide and Dear Colleague Letter encouraging postsecondary institutions to assess whether criminal justice information is necessary to make an informed admission decision and highlight the importance of supporting all students, including those who have been incarcerated or come in contact with the justice system, toward postsecondary completion upon admittance. This new guide marks a continuation of the Obama Administration’s commitment to mitigating unnecessary collateral impacts of incarceration and helping colleges and universities to design admissions policies that attract a diverse and qualified student body without creating unnecessary barriers for prospective students who have been involved with the justice system.

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Career Pathways: A Common Commitment

Image of joint letter on Career Pathways signed by 12 agencies.

Download the joint letter on Career Pathways signed by 12 agencies.

See the joint blog post on ED’s Homeroom Blog that announces a new 12-agency joint letter in support of career pathways and a common definition.

This letter marks a major milestone in the federal effort to align policies and technical assistance to support career pathways approaches in every community.

Through shared definitions and goals for career pathway systems, the federal government is taking steps toward removing obstacles for state and local areas to streamline programs and services to make it easier for individuals, including those with significant disabilities, to navigate and succeed in attaining their career goals.

Presidential Scholars in CTE announced

In a historic moment for our nation’s career and technical education (CTE) community, Secretary of Education, John B. King issued a press release yesterday to announce the 52nd class of U. S. Presidential Scholars, including an inaugural 20 students in CTE.

The inaugural CTE students are:

  • Tanusri V. Balla, Academy of Information Technology, Stamford, Connecticut
  • Sierra R. Day, Cerro Gordo High School, Cerro Gordo, Illinois
  • Samantha N. Dorwin, Charles H. McCann Technical School, North Adams, Massachusetts
  • Jose L. Espinel, Alan C. Pope High School, Roswell, Georgia
  • Joseph A. Fujinami, Mililani High School, Mililani, Hawaii
  • Makayla Hendricks, Bountiful High School, Bountiful, Utah
  • Carter M. Jones, Southern Wayne High School, Mount Olive, North Carolina
  • Madison Largey, Central Kitsap High School, Silverdale, Washington
  • Jordan Lee, Nettleton High School, Jonesboro, Arkansas
  • Alyssa M. McGee, Sumner High School, Sumner, Washington
  • Brent R. Miller, Lyons-Decatur Northeast School, Lyons, Nebraska
  • Marlie A. Montandon, Warren County High School, McMinnville, Tennessee
  • Madeline P. Poole, Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences, Chicago, Illinois
  • Mohammad H. Rahim, Carl Wunsche Sr. High School, Spring, Texas
  • Nicholas M. Santangelo, Marriotts Ridge High School, Woodstock, Maryland
  • Kendra L. Spier, Cambridge Senior High School, Cambridge, Wisconsin
  • Meghna S. Sreenivas, Reservoir High School, Fulton, Maryland
  • Mackenzie R. Wooten, Northwest Career and Technical Academy, Las Vegas, Nevada
  • Norman Xiong, Severna Park Senior High School, Severna Park, Maryland
  • Mindy S. Young, Coldwater Senior High School, Coldwater, Michigan

The Presidential Scholars program was established in 1964 by President Lyndon B. Johnson to honor high school seniors for their academic success, leadership, and service to school and community. The program was expanded in 1979 to recognize students in the visual, creative, and performing arts.


Having the White House recognize that CTE students are performing at a level worthy of recognition as U. S. Presidential Scholars is a testament to the commitment to quality and rigor of CTE programs being delivered by teachers, administrators, business and industry leaders, and other key stakeholders all across the country.

—Johan E. Uvin, Deputy Assistant Secretary, OCTAE

In 2015, the White House announced that students in Career and Technical Education would also be recognized for this esteemed honor. Students were selected through a rigorous process that began with open nominations. The White House Commission on Presidential Scholars reviewed the applications and selected the students who demonstrated the highest level of accomplishment and commitment to their education.

The 20 U. S. Presidential Scholars in CTE will be honored alongside the other 140 members of the 52nd class of scholars in a ceremony on June 19, 2016, in Washington, DC. During the ceremony, each honoree will receive a Presidential Scholar Medallion.

We extend our congratulations to each of these students and wish them all the best for future success.

SLMiller2
Posted by
Director, Division of Academic and Technical Education, OCTAE

Performance Partnership Pilots: An Opportunity to Improve Outcomes for Disconnected Youth

Federal agencies have released a second call for bold proposals to improve education, employment, and other key outcomes for disconnected youth.

Over five million 14-to-24-year-olds in the U.S. are out of school and not working. In many cases, they face the additional challenges including being low-income, homeless, in foster care, or involved in the justice system. In response, seven federal agencies are jointly inviting state, local, and tribal communities to apply to become a Performance Partnership Pilot (P3) to test innovative, outcome-focused strategies to achieving better outcomes for these youth, as well as youth at risk of becoming disconnected from critical social institutions and supports.

The P3 initiative allows pilots to receive customized flexibility from the participating agencies—including the U.S. Departments of Education, Labor, Health and Human Services, the Corporation for National and Community Service, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and now also the U.S. Department of Justice—to overcome barriers and align program and reporting requirements across programs. This flexibility enables communities to pursue the most innovative and effective ways to use their existing funds to improve outcomes for the neediest youth.

In October 2015, the Department of Education announced the first round of nine pilots on behalf of all the participating agencies. From supporting youth moms and their young children with a two-generation approach to helping foster care youth transition successfully from high school to college and career, these pilots will serve a total of roughly 10,000 disconnected youth. For example, the City of Indianapolis will be providing comprehensive, concentrated, and coordinated services to low-income, disconnected youth ages 14 through 24 who reside within two public housing communities that are located in the city’s Opportunity Zone, a collective impact initiative modeled on the Northside Achievement Zone in Minneapolis, MN. The Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program, a local workforce development board, is also implementing a collective impact model to improve outcomes for youth. It will be working with Partners for Education at Berea College, and the Kentucky Highlands Promise Zone to provide services and activities to address the needs of 1,000 disconnected youth in the rural Southeastern Kentucky Promise Zone.

This second round of pilots offers up to 10 communities the opportunity to propose bold new ideas for how they would use P3 flexibility to transform the way they deliver services and improve outcomes for their disconnected youth.

Stakeholders on the front lines of service delivery have let us know that flexibility, such as better aligning the multiple systems that serve youth, is sometimes needed to achieve powerful outcomes. P3 responds directly to these challenges by offering broad new flexibility in exchange for better outcomes.

This round of P3 includes several priorities to test this authority in diverse environments across America and support broader learning in the field. For example, acknowledging the diverse needs of communities, the competition allows separate categories of consideration for applicants that propose to serve disconnected youth in rural communities, in tribal communities, or in communities that recently have experienced civil unrest. In addition, applicants can earn bonus points in the selection process by proposing to rigorously evaluate at least one component of their pilot, proposing to implement work-based learning opportunities, or proposing projects that would specifically serve youth who are neither employed nor in school.

A competition for a third round of up to 10 pilots is expected to be released in the summer of 2016. This will provide another opportunity for communities that need more time to collaborate and prepare their best proposals. Additionally, this third competition round will permit communities to use their Continuum of Care and Emergency Solutions Grants Program funds, funded through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, in the pilots.

To hear representatives from Federal agencies present the details of the recently released Notice Inviting Applications (NIA) on P3, including application requirements and selection criteria, please register and join us for the P3 National Webinar on May 9th at 1PM ET. Registration information is available at www.youth.gov/P3.

Seeking Colleges Interested in Stackable Credentials

Mapping Upward: Stackable Credentials That Lead to Careers

Technical Assistance will be available to community colleges under a new initiative launched by OCTAE. “Mapping Upward” will provide technical assistance to five networks of community and/or technical colleges as they work to embed stackable, industry-recognized credentials within technical associate degree programs.

A webinar is being held May 3 to provide more information on the project and its goals.

Each of the five networks of colleges will consist of two to four community colleges that will develop action plans specific to the workforce needs of their communities while benefiting from the sector-focused peer learning community of the network.

The five teams will be selected through an application process that closes on May 18. The selected teams will participate in an institute in July and will receive customized assistance from subject matter experts and a dedicated coach who will guide their network through needs assessments, goal setting, and action planning. Over a year, the colleges will gain insights into stackable credential design, employer engagement, the alignment of industry certifications, faculty collaboration, awarding of credit, and credit transfer agreements.

You can find more information on the project on the Perkins Collaborative Resource Network along with a link to register for the webinar to be held on May 3.

Posted by
Robin Utz serves as the chief for the College and Career Transitions branch in the Division of Academic and Technical Education (DATE) for Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) at the US Department of Education.

The President’s Upskill Initiative: 1 Year Later

See a summary at the White House blog of an event that spotlighted how employers nationwide have answered the President’s call to train frontline workers with the skills to earn higher-paying jobs.

Image shows 8 out of 10 low-skilled workers are parents

8 out of 10 low-skilled workers are parents

Supporting materials:

OCTAE fact sheet on the profile of lower-skilled working-age (16 to 65 years old) adults, their highest level of education attained, in which industries they are employed, and how much they are earning, on average, for the work they do. Data from the Survey for Adult Skills 2012/2014.

Information from the Department of Labor on how businesses can engage in the workforce system here.

To learn more about what outside groups and employers are doing to support upskilling, visit UpskillAmerica.org.