WIOA Provides Opportunity for Partnership to Serve Out of School Youth

This blog is cross-posted from the WorkforceGPS site, see https://youth.workforcegps.org/blog/general/2017/01/18/15/08/EdLaborPartnership.  

WIOA places heightened emphasis on the alignment of programs that serve out-of-school youth in order to ensure they obtain the skills necessary to prepare for successful workforce participation and continued educational achievement.

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), signed into law on July 22, 2014, presents a unique opportunity for collaboration among the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), the U.S. Department of Education (ED), States, local workforce development areas, other workforce and education partners, as well as social service providers, in order to improve the lives of our nation’s out-of-school youth (OSY).  WIOA places heightened emphasis on the alignment of programs that serve out-of-school youth in order to ensure they obtain the skills necessary to prepare for successful workforce participation and continued educational achievement.

For many years, the adult education program, administered by ED and authorized under title II of WIOA, has reconnected older OSY with the educational system and equipped them with the foundational skills to pursue postsecondary education, training, and meaningful work.  The formula youth program, administered by DOL and authorized under title I of WIOA, requires that 75 percent of funds be used on services for OSY, which will assist young adults in obtaining the necessary skills, including high school diplomas, to prepare for and complete postsecondary education and training and achieve high levels of career readiness.  More than 5.5 million youth between the ages of 16 and 24 without a high school diploma or an equivalent are neither in school nor employed.  By working together, State and local workforce and education partners can maximize the potential of these young adults through implementing evidence-based practices to support the successful achievement of their educational and career goals.

To facilitate these efforts, the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education (Departments) are releasing a technical assistance document that:

  • provide strategies and examples of State and local partnerships that facilitate the reengagement of OSY;
  • support communities working with in-school youth in accordance with WIOA; and
  • address strategies for serving out-of-school English learners, current and former foster youth, and justice-involved youth.

Along with the technical assistance on OSY, additional documents may be distributed among all potential partners that serve youth and young adults.  The technical assistance documents are available:

The technical assistance provided in these documents offers a number of examples of ways in which different partners can work together to build career pathways that are a combination of rigorous and high-quality education, training, and support services that align with local skill needs and prepare youth and young adults to be successful in secondary or postsecondary education programs and the labor market.

Ultimately, long-term success for OSY will require engagement beyond the scope of workforce and education agencies.  It takes the engagement of entire communities to catalyze change and create multiple pathways to facilitate education, career, and lifelong success.  These discussions, therefore, must include businesses, colleges and universities, State and district superintendents, teachers and other youth service providers, community-based organizations, local social service agencies, and families and youth themselves.

We hope this technical assistance series will support creative and impactful youth-focused strategies and be a resource in engaging these diverse partners in this important work.  Together we will strengthen our nation’s workforce by supporting the nation’s youth in graduating from secondary and postsecondary education programs, participating successfully in career pathways, and achieving their career goals.

#ApprenticeshipWorks for High School

This article also appears on the U.S. Department of Labor Blog

Photo of Deputy Labor Secretary Chris Lu gathered with students around a student sitting at a desk with a laptop opened.

Deputy Labor Secretary Chris Lu hears from students at Phelps Architecture, Construction and Engineering High School in Washington, D.C. This unique public high school offers both college preparatory and vocational education dedicated to design professions and construction trades.

By offering pathways to career-ready skills, a paycheck and debt-free college credit, registered apprenticeship is the gold standard of work-based learning.

This program brings many high school students a future they never imagined. Bobby didn’t think he had many options after graduating from high school in rural Kentucky. Apprenticeship changed his life forever. During Bobby’s junior year of high school, he entered an apprenticeship program in advanced manufacturing with an employer in his hometown. After graduating, Bobby earned 30 college credits paid by the employer and completed over 1,700 hours of on-the-job training. Now, he works full time for the same company and is set to earn more money than his parents ever dreamed of for their family.

Employers see apprenticeship as a powerful tool for finding and developing talent. Parents and students see the value in a structured, earn-and-learn postsecondary pathway. Academic leaders see apprenticeship as a clear strategy for ensuring their high school and college graduates have the skills and competencies they need for tomorrow’s jobs.

While the average U.S. apprentice is 30 years old, other countries target younger workers. In countries like Germany, Switzerland and the UK, apprenticeships bridge the education system and the world of work, introducing high school students to jobs in a variety of industries. This European model enables students to connect to employment opportunities and access postsecondary education at an earlier age.

Successful registered apprenticeship programs across the country are connecting students to careers in critical, high-paying, in-demand industries such as IT, health care, and advanced manufacturing.

  • In North Carolina, the NCWorks Youth Apprenticeship program offers high school students opportunities to earn credit for secondary Career and Technical Education coursework, college credits, and on-the-job training with a registered apprenticeship sponsor. After graduation, students complete their apprenticeship along with their associate degree, which is paid by the employer. Siemens and Ameritech are part of a consortium of employers that work with local high schools and Central Piedmont Community College on this workforce pipeline.
  • In Wisconsin, the Youth Apprenticeship program, the oldest in the country, requires students to complete two years of 450 work hours per year and four semesters of related classroom instruction. Students work in advanced manufacturing with employers such as Harley Davidson and LDI Industries.
  • In South Carolina, Apprenticeship Carolina has over 100 youth apprenticeship programs sponsored by different employers such as Agape Healthcare, IFA-Rotorion (advanced manufacturing) and Hull Hospitality Group (culinary arts). Students earn their registered apprenticeship certificate before or after high school graduation.
  • The Tech Ready Apprentices for Careers in Kentucky (TRACK) youth pre-apprenticeship program is a business- and industry-driven program designed to create a pipeline for high school students to enter postsecondary apprenticeship training in manufacturing, welding, electrical work and carpentry. Employers are able to tailor the program for their specific needs and to select the career and technical education courses and students for their apprenticeship pathway. Students receive a nationally recognized credential at little or no cost.

As high schools and community colleges look for innovative ways to ensure students graduate with career-ready skills, registered apprenticeship is a ready-made solution. More employers can join this movement by partnering with local high schools. Interested in finding out how you can bring youth apprenticeship to your state? Check out the Office of Apprenticeship’s website for more resources and talk to your Office of Apprenticeship state director and CTE state director.

Editor’s note: Join the conversation about how #ApprenticeshipWorks during National Apprenticeship Week 2016 by using the hashtag on social media.

Eric Seleznow is the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Employment and Training. Kim R. Ford is the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Education for Career, Technical and Adult Education.

Posted by
Deputy Assistant Secretary, OCTAE
Posted by
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training, U.S. Department of Labor

Six Federal Agencies Commit to Make College Access and Completion a Reality for More Americans

Today, Secretary of Education John King announced the release of a federal interagency letter, Aligning Federal Supports and Program Delivery for College Access and Completion. The interagency letter highlights the latest guidance and resources that clarify how existing provisions within federal programs of the U.S. Departments of Education, Agriculture, Health and Human Services, Housing and Urban Development, Labor, and Treasury can be better aligned for postsecondary access and completion. Secretary King made the announcement at the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities’ annual meeting in Austin, Texas, an event that gathered over 1,300 senior leaders from public higher institutions from across North America.

By 2020, an estimated two-thirds of job openings will require some postsecondary education or training. Studies have shown that college graduates with a bachelor’s degree earn about 66 percent more than those with only a high school diploma and are far less likely to face unemployment. Over the course of a lifetime, the average worker with a bachelor’s degree will earn approximately $1 million more than a worker without any postsecondary education. However, too many students fail to complete their education due to resource constraints. Because now, more than ever before, a college degree is a necessity for individual economic opportunity and competitiveness, alignment of federal programs and policies towards completion is essential. The strength and long-term success of our nation’s economy weighs on a robust higher education system that helps all students succeed.

The interagency letter lists actions taken by each of the six agencies to better help individuals make one the most important investments one can make in his or her future a reality. For example, the U.S. Department of Education recently issued guidance clarifying requirements that designated public school district homeless liaisons inform all unaccompanied homeless youth identified by the district of their eligibility for independent student status on the FAFSA, and this guidance is linked within the letter. Independent status can help homeless students access more aid to cover tuition and books, as well as help secure reliable room and board. Another example is guidance issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture indicating that students attending an institution of higher education through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program’s (SNAP) Employment and Training program at least half-time are exempt from the SNAP student rule and, as a result, potentially eligible for SNAP.

In addition to the joint interagency letter, the U.S. Department of Education released the Innovating and Partnering to Support Completion and Success in Higher Education fact sheet spotlighting the results of initiatives made under the Obama Administration that have helped thousands of Americans enroll in and complete college. Such investments have helped Black and Hispanic students earn over 270,000 more undergraduate degrees in 2013-14 than in 2008-09; and a million more Black and Hispanic students enrolled in college in 2014 than in 2008.

The Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education, along with its federal partners, is committed to ensuring that federal provisions and other initiatives fulfill their promise of breaking down barriers to accessing the knowledge and skills needed to attain a well-paying job, support a family, and contribute to our community. With the help of state and local partners, together we can strengthen coordination of programs that connect more people to postsecondary opportunities and leverage federal policies that more effectively serve our communities.

Posted by
Special Assistant Office of the Assistant Secretary OCTAE

Opportunity@Work and OCTAE Announce Partnership

It Is Time to Rewire the Labor Market, Particularly for Those Americans Who Get Overlooked Too Often

The current system of hiring- where employers hire for open positions based on a person’s education and job history- is outdated, overlooks millions of people, and leaves too many jobs unfilled. Opportunity@Work and a growing number of public and private agencies are working to transform these outdated hiring practices by proving to companies that they can hire based on mastery rather than pedigree by giving everyone a chance to show what they can do. If you have the skills to fill a vacant job, then you should get the job.

Tess Posner, Managing Director of TechHire for Opportunity@Work, Kim R. Ford, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning and Management, Carmen Drummond, Chief of Staff, Johan Uvin, Acting Assistant Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education, and Yolanda Townsend, Senior Vice-President and General Counsel for Opportunity@Work take a moment to celebrate the agreement between the U.S. Department of Education and Opportunity@Work to support TechHire and other communities interested in using demand-side approaches to get more Americans to work.

Tess Posner, Managing Director of TechHire for Opportunity@Work, Kim R. Ford, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning and Management, Carmen Drummond, Chief of Staff, Johan Uvin, Acting Assistant Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education, and Yolanda Townsend, Senior Vice-President and General Counsel for Opportunity@Work take a moment to celebrate the agreement between the U.S. Department of Education and Opportunity@Work to support TechHire and other communities interested in using demand-side approaches to get more Americans to work.

“If employers want to solve the skills gap, the solution is to hire for skills mastery rather than resume history.” — Byron Auguste, CEO and Co-Founder, Opportunity@Work

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Improved Reentry Education Grantee Recognized by the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council

The Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC) is an industry-led, training, assessment and certification system. Their mission is focused on advancing the core skills and knowledge needed by the nation’s front-line production and material handling workers to allow workers the opportunity to demonstrate that they have acquired the skills needed for technology intensive jobs. MSSC recently highlighted work being done to help incarcerated individuals who are returning to their communities secure jobs, increase public safety, and save money.

OCTAE is pleased that one of the Improved Reentry Education grantees, Washburn Institute of Technology, was highlighted as an organization which features a MSSC pre-release program. The program allows students to obtain a Certified Production Technician credential, thanks to a partnership between Washburn University, the Kansas Department of Commerce, the Kansas Department of Corrections, and the Kansas Workforce Center. These programs help individuals acquire certifications and credentials, allowing them to succeed in the labor market and break the cycle of incarceration.

An important part of this programming is tracking student outcomes to help ascertain success, and the Washburn students excelled in the program. Of 184 students who participated in the program, almost 1,000 credentials were earned, including over 500 full Certified Production Technician credentials.  Since March 31, 2016, 70 students had been released, with 60% of them obtaining gainful employment after reentering, and only 12% of students re-incarcerated.

Learn more in the following linked resources:

OCTAE’s Office of Correctional Education

The Reentry Education Toolkit, designed to help programs and communities improve services for returning citizens

A Community Practice for Correctional Educators, with over 700 participating members

Nondegree Credentials in Correctional Education: Status, Challenges, and Benefits (Department of Education, 2016)

Adult Education and Family Literacy Week 2016 Roundup

Thank you to everyone who helped make Adult Education and Family Literacy Week 2016 so vibrant and far-reaching! Check out some of the great tweets we caught during the week on #AEFLWeek.

USCIS Awards Citizenship and Integration Grants in 21 States

This information is cross-posted from the USCIS site. Read the full press release and list of providers here.

On Sept. 1, 2016, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced the award of nearly $10 million in grants under two competitive funding opportunities to 46 organizations to help permanent residents prepare and apply for U.S. citizenship. The recipient organizations serve both traditional immigrant destinations and new immigrant gateway cities in 21 states. The grant recipients will provide citizenship preparation services to approximately 25,000 permanent residents from more than 50 countries. The recipients represent:

  • Seventeen of the top 20 states with the largest permanent resident populations (California, New York, Texas, Florida, New Jersey, Illinois, Massachusetts, Virginia, Washington, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Michigan, North Carolina, Connecticut, Ohio Minnesota and Colorado);
  • Nine of the top 10 metropolitan areas with the most new permanent residents in the past 10 years (New York City; Los Angeles; Miami; Washington, D.C.; Chicago; San Francisco; Houston; Dallas-Fort Worth; and Boston); and
  • Nine of the top 10 states with the most naturalizations over the last 10 years (California, New York, Florida, Texas, New Jersey, Illinois, Massachusetts, Virginia and Washington).

National Coalition for Literacy 2016 Awards

Johan Uvin speaking at podium after accepting award.

Johan Uvin accepting National Coalition for Literacy award.

OCTAE is proud to have witnessed the Literacy Leadership Award given by the National Coalition for Literacy (NCL) to our own Acting Assistant Secretary Johan E. Uvin on September 27, 2016. The ceremony is held in honor of Adult Education and Family Literacy Week, which is celebrated at events in communities across the country to help raise awareness about this issue.  Follow along on Twitter at #AEFLWeek.

During the ceremony, NCL President Jeff Carter said, “Many in this room and around the country know Johan from his tireless work at OCTAE over the last seven years, but Johan would be deserving of this award even if he had never come to Washington: his years of dedication to adult learners, and his accomplishments as a leader in our field, are that impressive. Johan possesses all of the most critical characteristics of a great leader: focus, passion, honesty, intellectual curiosity — and most of all, he truly cares. That is also why he is a great educator.”

Also honored at this year’s event were:

  • Senator Jack Reed, who has been a champion for adult education funding in the U.S. Senate, and at the forefront of legislative efforts to strengthen adult education research and adult education’s role in the workforce system and career and technical education.
  • The Division of Consumer & Business Education at the Federal Trade Commission’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, for its commitment to serving and guiding adults with limited reading ability, and for its outreach to those working with them, particularly teachers in adult basic education and ESL programs. See an OCTAE blog post from earlier this year sharing the many resources from the FTC, and the FTC blog announcing the award.
  • Margaret Becker Patterson, of Research Allies for Lifelong Learning, and Marty Finsterbusch, of VALUE USA, for ALLIES, a groundbreaking research study on adult learner leadership.
  • John Y. Cole, Library of Congress Historian and founding Director of the Center for the Book, who has been instrumental in shaping numerous literacy and reading-promotion programs during his 50-year tenure at the Library, including the Library of Congress Literacy Awards.
  • Congressman Rubén Hinojosa (D-TX), the co-chair of the House Adult Literacy Caucus, received special recognition for his life-long commitment in support of adult education, and for outstanding leadership in advocating education as a congressional and national priority.

 

Learning More About English Learner Youth

This post joins an ongoing series, examining trends in needs and services for disconnected youth. (See the first post, 5 Million Reasons to Care About Youth.) This post welcomes Libia Gil, Assistant Deputy Secretary and Director of the Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA), as a co-author, with Johan Uvin, Acting Assistant Secretary of OCTAE.

OCTAE and OELA have teamed up to learn more about the demographic characteristics, educational attainment, and employment status of older adolescent and young adult English learners (ELs), ages 14 – 21. Many of these learners are unable to complete high school within the traditional time frame and may enroll in adult education programs to earn a high school credential, improve their English language skills, and acquire job skills.
25-million-els-nationwide

This Executive Summary and Infographic, Older Adolescent and Young Adult English Learners: A Study of Demographics, Policies, and Programs,summarizes an extensive analysis of the relevant data from the American Community Survey (ACS) and Current Population Survey (CPS) data.

Key findings about older adolescents and young adult ELs, compared to their non-EL peers, summarized on the infographic include:

  • ELs are more likely to not complete high school, especially in the older 19-21 year old cohort with 22% of ELs vs. 6% of non-ELs without a high school credential;
  • ELs are less likely to be enrolled in formal education, especially in the older 19-21 year old cohort with 44% of ELs vs. 60% non-ELs enrolled; and
  • For those not enrolled, ELs are more likely to be employed.

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The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities Presents: Back to School Week!

This is cross-posted from the Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, see the full article with all the events and follow along on Twitter with #HBCUB2School.  

Back to School Week

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HCBU) has partnered with several of our Federal Agency Partners to present Back to School Week on September 19th-23rd 2016.  This week-long celebration will bring federal agencies closer to HBCU students to highlight student opportunities in the government and shine a light on some of the work of the agencies.  To reach as many HBCU students as possible, we will provide a mix of both in-person and virtual events.  Be sure to read each event description as some require pre-registration.  Please check back as the list of events is being updated. Happy Back to School Time! Read more.