OSEP Releases a new Fast Facts on Students with Traumatic Brain Injury Served Under IDEA, Part B

U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs. OSEP Fast Facts: Students Identified With Traumatic Brain Injuries. Bar graph shows: Percent of School Aged Students With Disabilities Identified With Traumatic Brain Injury, Ages 5 to 21, Served Under IDEA, Part B, in the US, Outlying Areas, and Freely Associated States: Between SY 2014-15 and 2021-22. 2014=.43%; 2015 = .42%; 2016 = .42%; 2017=.41%, 2018=.40%; 2019 = .36%; 2020 = .36%; 2021 = .38%. Students with traumatic brain injury are less likely to be served in the age range 5-11 and more likely to be served in the age range 12-17 than all students with disabilities.

By the Office of Special Education Programs

Less than 1% of school aged students with disabilities are identified with traumatic brain injury. OSEP‘s latest Fast Facts takes a closer look at data from the data collections authorized under IDEA Section 618, including those collected through child count, educational environments, discipline and exiting data collections with a lens on students identified with traumatic brain injury.

Highlights from OSEP Fast Facts: Educational Environments of School Aged Children with Disabilities

  • Students with traumatic brain injury are less likely to be served in the age range 5–11 and more likely to be served in the age range 12–17 than all students with disabilities.
  • In school year (SY) 2021–22, White students are more likely to be identified with traumatic brain injury and Hispanic/Latino students were less likely to be identified with traumatic brain injury than all students with disabilities.
  • In SY 2020–21, children with traumatic brain injury, ages 14–21, exiting school were more likely to graduate and less likely to drop out than all students with disabilities.
  • In SY 2021–22, students with traumatic brain injury were less likely to be served inside a regular class 80% or more of the day than all students with disabilities.

OSEP Fast Facts is an ongoing effort to display data from the 12 data collections authorized under IDEA Section 618 into graphic, visual representations with the intent to present 618 data quickly and clearly.

Visit the OSEP Fast Facts page for existing and future Fast Facts.


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