New Guidance Reaffirms Importance of Full Implementation of IDEA Amidst COVID-19 Pandemic

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) sent a letter to its state and local partners reiterating its commitment to ensuring children with disabilities and their families have successful early intervention and educational experiences in the 2021–2022 school year.

This letter outlines a series of question and answers (Q&As) as children and students return to in-person learning. The Q&As focus on topics to help ensure that — regardless of the COVID-19 pandemic or the mode of instruction — children with disabilities receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and that infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families receive early intervention services.

The Q&As document on Child Find Under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act is the first Q&A in the series and reaffirms the importance of appropriate implementation of IDEA’s child find obligations, which requires the identification, location and evaluation, of all children with disabilities in the states. An effective child find system is an ongoing part of each state’s responsibility to ensure that FAPE is made available to all eligible children with disabilities.

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Information Technology Specialist, U.S. Department of Education

OSEP Fast Facts Looks at Race and Ethnicity of Children with Disabilities Served under IDEA

By the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

Screen captuer of OSEP Fast Facts on Race and Ethnicity

WASHINGTON (August 13, 2021) – The Office of Special Education Programs released an OSEP Fast Facts and supplemental tool focused on race and ethnicity of children with disabilities served under IDEA served under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Highlights from an OSERS Blog include:

  • Asian students with disabilities are more likely to be identified with autism or hearing impairment than all students with disabilities and less likely to drop out and more likely to graduate with a regular high school diploma than all students with disabilities.
  • Black or African American students with disabilities are more likely to be identified with intellectual disability or emotional disturbance than all students with disabilities and more likely to receive a disciplinary removal than all students with disabilities.
  • Hispanic students with disabilities are more likely to be identified with hearing impairment or specific learning disability than all students with disabilities.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native students with disabilities are more likely to drop out than all students with disabilities and less likely to be inside regular class less than 40% of the day than all students with disabilities.
  • White students with disabilities are more likely to be served inside a regular class 80% or more of the day than all students with disabilities and less likely to be identified with specific learning disability or intellectual disability than all students with disabilities.

Additionally, OSEP released a “Hand In Hand” supplemental tool that parents and stakeholders can use alongside the new OSEP Fast Fact. This new tool guides users through the OSEP Fast Facts and is presented with critical questions to allow parents and other stakeholders to engage with the materials.

OSEP Fast Facts is an ongoing effort to display data from the 12 data collections authorized under IDEA Section 618 into graphic, visual representations with the intent to present 618 data quickly and clearly.

Visit the OSEP Fast Facts page for existing and future Fast Facts.

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Information Technology Specialist, U.S. Department of Education

Hand In Hand for OSEP Fast Facts: Race and Ethnicity of Children with Disabilities Served under IDEA Part B

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Information Technology Specialist, U.S. Department of Education

OSEP Fast Facts: Race and Ethnicity of Children with Disabilities Served under IDEA Part B

Posted by
Information Technology Specialist, U.S. Department of Education

U.S. Department of Education Issues Resource on Students and Children with Long COVID

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services issued a resource entitled Long COVID under Section 504 and the IDEA:  A Resource to Support Children, Students, Educators, Schools, Service Providers, and Families. This resource for all stakeholders in the education community provides information about the obligations of schools, public agencies, and postsecondary institutions to students and children with long COVID.

Read the resource: PDF (309K)

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Information Technology Specialist, U.S. Department of Education

Department Releases 2019 Determination Letters on State Implementation of the IDEA

By the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

WASHINGTON (July 9, 2019) — The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services released its 2019 state determinations on the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of Part B and Part C for fiscal year 2017.

The 2004 amendments to the IDEA require each state to develop a State Performance Plan (SPP) and Annual Performance Report (APR) that evaluates the state’s efforts to implement the requirements and purposes of the IDEA, and describes how the state will improve its implementation.

The IDEA details four categories for the Secretary of Education’s determinations. A state’s determination may be:

  • Meets the requirements and purposes of IDEA;
  • Needs assistance in implementing the requirements of IDEA;
  • Needs intervention in implementing the requirements of IDEA; or
  • Needs substantial intervention in implementing the requirements of IDEA.

View 2019 Determination Letters Fact Sheet

View 2019 SPP/APRs Part B and Part C

Department proposes two-year postponement of significant disproportionality regulations implementation

WASHINGTON (Feb. 27, 2018)—The U.S. Department of Education published a notice of proposed rulemaking concerning the Department’s significant disproportionality regulations in the Federal Register for comment Feb. 27.

The department has proposed to postpone compliance of the Dec. 19, 2016 regulations for two years by changing the compliance date from July 1, 2018 to July 1, 2020.

The department also proposed to postpone the date children ages three through five must be included in the analysis of significant disproportionality from July 1, 2020, to July 1, 2022.

“We are proposing to postpone the compliance date in order to thoroughly review the significant disproportionality regulations and ensure that that they effectively address the issue of significant disproportionality and best serve children with disabilities. This analysis is part of the Department’s Regulatory Reform activities pursuant to Executive Order 13777, ‘Enforcing the Regulatory Reform Agenda,’” said the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services in an email to state special education directors and other OSERS’ stakeholders Feb. 27.

The 75-day comment period on the proposed postponement begins Feb. 27.

Those interested in submitting comments can do so online at www.regulations.gov, which also has instructions for accessing agency documents, submitting comments and viewing documents.

Commenters can also submit hard copy comments via postal mail, commercial delivery, or hand delivery. The notice of proposed rulemaking contains specific instructions for submitting hard copy comments.

View Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

Department to automatically redirect old IDEA site traffic to new IDEA site April 30

By the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

WASHINGTON (Feb. 2, 2018)—The Department of Education will automatically direct users from the Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004 site to the new Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) website starting April 30, 2018.

The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) launched the new IDEA website in June 2017 in order to provide updated department information regarding the IDEA to the public including students, parents/families, educators, service providers and advocates.

The Legacy site was developed in 2006 as a result of the 2004 reauthorization of the IDEA. The site was updated mostly between 2006 and 2011 and had not received updates since 2013.

While the Legacy site will redirect users to the new IDEA site on April 30, content from the Legacy site is available for reference on the new IDEA website on the Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004 historical reference page.

OSERS determined it would leave the Legacy site live after the new site launched to provide stakeholders ample time to compare the two sites, adapt to the new site and provide feedback to OSERS.

OSERS has made updates to the site based on the feedback it received from stakeholders since the initial launch of the new IDEA website and will continue to gather feedback on the OSERS Blog.

OSERS will continue to enhance and add content to the new IDEA website to ensure the new site remains current.

IDEA website users are encouraged to bookmark the new IDEA website: https://sites.ed.gov/idea.

OSERS requests users still referring people to the Legacy site through their personal or organizational websites, social media accounts, communication documents, or other means update their communication channels to direct people to the new IDEA website.

 

Submit comments at the OSERS Blog

Read transcript from Feb. 2 Stakeholder Call

View the Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004 historical reference page

View the Department of Education’s June press release about the IDEA website

Department Welcomes Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Assistant Secretary

WASHINGTON (Jan. 26, 2018)—The U.S. Department of Education welcomed Johnny Collett, the new U.S. Department of Education assistant secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), Jan. 16.

Collett, a former high school special education teacher, has served as the program director of Special Education Outcomes at the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and as the Kentucky state special education director.

Collett has also served as an assistant division director and exceptional children consultant both at the Kentucky Department of Education.

Collett will lead OSERS towards its mission to improve early childhood, educational, and employment outcomes and raise expectations for all people with disabilities, their families, their communities, and the nation.

OSERS comprises the Office of Special Education Programs, which administers the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and the Rehabilitation Service Administration, which administers titles I, III, VI, and VII, as well as Section 509 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). OSERS’ Office of the Assistant Secretary administers a number of special projects.

To learn more about Collett, view his bio.

Department submits Annual Report to Congress on nation’s progress related to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

By the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

WASHINGTON (Jan. 16, 2018)—The U.S. Department of Education submitted its 2017 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) annual report to Congress last week.

The 39th Annual Report to Congress focuses on children and student with disabilities who received services specific to IDEA Part C for infants and toddlers or IDEA Part B for children and youth.

The report summarizes U.S. progress in:

  1. providing a free appropriate public education (FAPE) for children with disabilities under IDEA, Part B and early intervention services to infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families under IDEA, Part C,
  2. ensuring that the rights of these children with disabilities and their parents are protected,
  3. assisting states and localities in providing for the education of all children with disabilities, and
  4. assessing the effectiveness of efforts to educate children with disabilities.

Read the 39th Annual Report to Congress preface or download the report.

2017 Annual Report to Congress on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

IDEA Parts B and C

This is the 39th Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2017. Section 664(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), as reauthorized in 2004, requires that the Department of Education report annually on the progress made toward the provision of a free appropriate public education to all children with disabilities and the provision of early intervention services to infants and toddlers with disabilities.

The 39th Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2017 describes our nation’s progress in:

  1. providing a free appropriate public education (FAPE) for children with disabilities under IDEA, Part B and early intervention services to infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families under IDEA, Part C,
  2. ensuring that the rights of these children with disabilities and their parents are protected,
  3. assisting states and localities in providing for the education of all children with disabilities, and
  4. assessing the effectiveness of efforts to educate children with disabilities.

The report focuses on the children and students with disabilities being served under IDEA, Parts C or B, nationally and at the state level.

Download Report


Since the enactment of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (EHA), Public Law (P.L.) 94‑142 and its successor statute, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the secretary of the U.S. Department of Education (secretary) (and her predecessor, the commissioner of education at the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare) have been required to transmit to Congress an annual report to inform Congress and the public of the progress being made in implementing the act. The annual reports to Congress reflect a history of persistent commitment and effort to expand educational opportunities for children with disabilities.

The most recent reauthorization of IDEA (P.L. 108-446) occurred in December 2004, and section 664(d) of the IDEA continues to require the annual report. With the reauthorization of IDEA, the nation reaffirmed its commitment to improving the early intervention and educational results and functional outcomes for infants, toddlers, children, and youths with disabilities (collectively, this group may be referred to in this report as children with disabilities).

The 39th Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2017 describes our nation’s progress in:

  1. providing a free appropriate public education (FAPE) for children with disabilities under IDEA, Part B, and early intervention services to infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families under IDEA, Part C;
  2. ensuring that the rights of these children with disabilities and their parents are protected;
  3. assisting states and localities in providing for the education of all children with disabilities; and
  4. assessing the effectiveness of efforts to educate children with disabilities.

The report focuses on the children and students with disabilities being served under IDEA, Part C or B, nationally and at the state level. In particular, Part C of IDEA provides funds to states to assist them in developing and implementing statewide, comprehensive, coordinated, multidisciplinary interagency systems to make early intervention services available to all eligible children from birth through age 2 with disabilities and their families, whereas Part B of IDEA provides funds to states to assist them in making FAPE available to eligible children ages 3 through 21 with disabilities who are in need of special education and related services. Throughout this report, individuals with disabilities who receive services under IDEA, Part C or Part B, are referred to as infants and toddlers served under IDEA, Part C; children served under IDEA, Part B; or students served under IDEA, Part B. “Special education services” is a term used throughout this report to represent services provided under IDEA, Part B. Similarly, “early intervention services” is a term used synonymously with services provided under IDEA, Part C.

This 39th Annual Report to Congress, 2017 follows the 38th Annual Report to Congress, 2016 in sequence and format, and it continues to focus on IDEA results and accountability. Similar to the 38th Annual Report to Congress, 2016, the 39th Annual Report to Congress, 2017 contains six major sections that address the five annual report requirements contained in section 664(d) of IDEA. The sections are:

  1. a summary and analysis of IDEA section 618 data at the national level;
  2. a summary and analysis of IDEA section 618 data at the state level;
  3. a summary and analysis of the U.S. Department of Education’s (Department’s) findings and determinations regarding the extent to which states are meeting the requirements of IDEA, Parts B and C;
  4. a summary of special education research conducted under Part E of the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002;
  5. a summary of national special education studies and evaluations conducted under sections 664(a) and (c) of IDEA; and
  6. a summary of the extent and progress of the assessment of national activities, which focus on determining the effectiveness of IDEA and improving its implementation.

The content of this report differs from that of the 38th Annual Report to Congress, 2016 in the following ways:

  1. the most recent data presented in this report represent the following applicable reporting periods: fall 2015, school year 2014–15, or a 12-month reporting period during 2014–15;
  2. where data are presented for a 10-year period, the oldest data are associated with fall 2006; and
  3. the 39th Annual Report to Congress, 2017 is the first annual report to present data newly collected from states: the cumulative number of infants and toddlers with disabilities who participated in Part C during the school year in addition to the longstanding point-in-time data collection (i.e., the number of infants and toddlers served under Part C on the state-designated data collection date).

A summary of each of the six sections and three appendices that make up the 39th Annual Report to Congress, 2017 follows.


Preface Footnotes

The year in the title reflects the U.S. Department of Education’s target year for submitting the report to Congress. The most current data in this report were collected from July 2014 through December 2015. These data have been available to the public prior to their presentation in this report. Subsequent references to this report and previously published annual reports will be abbreviated as the “XX Annual Report to Congress”; they will not include “on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.”

Section 618 data consist of:

  1. the number of infants and toddlers served under IDEA, Part C; the settings in which they receive program services; information on the transition at age 3 out of Part C; and dispute resolution information, and
  2. the number of children and students served under IDEA, Part B; the environments in which they receive education; their participation in and performance on state assessments; information on their exiting special education services; the personnel employed to provide educational services to them; disciplinary actions that affect them; and dispute resolution information.

Section I contains national data pertinent to Parts C and B of IDEA. It contains four subsections. The four subsections focus on infants and toddlers served under IDEA, Part C; children ages 3 through 5 served under IDEA, Part B; students ages 6 through 21 served under IDEA, Part B; and children and students ages 3 through 21 served under IDEA, Part B. The exhibits provide information about the characteristics of infants, toddlers, children, and students receiving services under Parts C and B; their disabilities; the settings in which they receive services; their participation in and performance on state assessments; their exits from Part C and Part B programs; their disciplinary removals; and their legal disputes. Also addressed are the characteristics of the personnel employed to provide special education and related services for the children and students. The data presented in the exhibits and discussed in the bulleted text represent the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico herein), and the four outlying areas of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (the Northern Mariana Islands herein), and the Virgin Islands. In addition, the exhibits that concern special education and related services provided under IDEA, Part B, include data for Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) schools operated or funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior and the three freely associated states: the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of Palau, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

Section II contains state-level data regarding Part C and Part B of IDEA. This section is organized into four subsections. The first subsection presents information about infants and toddlers served under IDEA, Part C, while the second and third subsections present information about children ages 3 through 5 and students ages 6 through 21 served under IDEA, Part B, respectively. The fourth subsection provides information about children and students ages 3 through 21 served under IDEA, Part B. The four subsections address questions about the characteristics of infants, toddlers, children, and students receiving services under Parts C and B; their disabilities; the settings in which they receive services; their participation in state assessments; their exits from Part C and Part B programs; their disciplinary removals; and their legal disputes. Also addressed are the characteristics of the personnel employed to provide special education and related services for the children and students. The data presented in exhibits and discussed in the bulleted text represent the 50 states, the District of Columbia, BIE schools, and Puerto Rico.

Sections 616(d) and 642 of IDEA require the secretary to make an annual determination as to the extent to which each state’s Part B and Part C programs are meeting the requirements of IDEA. To fulfill this requirement, the secretary considers each state’s State Performance Plan (SPP)/Annual Performance Report (APR). Based on the information provided by the state in the SPP/APR, information obtained through monitoring reviews, and any other public information made available, the secretary determines if the state meets the requirements and purposes of IDEA, needs assistance in implementing the requirements, needs intervention in implementing the requirements, or needs substantial intervention in implementing the requirements. In June 2016, the Department issued the determination letters on implementation of IDEA for federal fiscal year (FFY) 2014 to 60 state education agencies (SEAs) for Part B and to 56 state lead agencies for Part C. Section III presents the results of the determinations.

When Congress reauthorized IDEA in December 2004, it amended the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-279) by adding a new Part E to that act. The new Part E established the National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) as part of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). NCSER began operation on July 1, 2005. As specified in section 175(b) of the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002, NCSER’s mission is to:

  • Sponsor research to expand knowledge and understanding of the needs of infants, toddlers, children, and students with disabilities in order to improve the developmental, educational, and transitional results of such individuals;
  • Sponsor research to improve services provided under, and support the implementation of, IDEA [20 United States Code (U.S.C.) section 1400 et seq.]; and
  • Evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of IDEA in coordination with the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance.

Section IV of this report describes the research projects funded by grants made during FFY 2016 (October 1, 2015, through September 30, 2016) by NCSER under Part E of the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002.

In the December 2004 reauthorization of IDEA, Congress required the secretary to delegate to the director of IES responsibility to carry out studies and evaluations under sections 664(a), (b), and (c) of IDEA. As specified in section 664(a) of IDEA, IES, either directly or through grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements awarded to eligible entities on a competitive basis, assesses the progress in the implementation of IDEA, including the effectiveness of state and local efforts to provide:

  1. FAPE to children and students with disabilities and
  2. early intervention services to infants and toddlers with disabilities and infants and toddlers who would be at risk of having substantial developmental delays if early intervention services were not provided to them.

As specified in section 664(c) of IDEA, IES is required to carry out a national study or studies that will inform efforts to ensure accountability for students who are held to alternate achievement standards. This section describes the studies and evaluations authorized by sections 664(a) and (c) of IDEA and supported by IES during FFY 2016 (Oct. 1, 2015, through Sept. 30, 2016).


Under section 664(b) of IDEA (as amended in 2004), the secretary is responsible for carrying out a “national assessment” of activities supported by federal funds under IDEA. As delegated by the secretary, IES is carrying out this national assessment to:
  1. determine the effectiveness of IDEA in achieving the law’s purpose;
  2. provide timely information to the president, Congress, the states, local education agencies (LEAs), and the public on how to implement IDEA more effectively; and
  3. provide the president and Congress with information that will be useful in developing legislation to achieve the purposes of IDEA more effectively.

The national assessment is designed to address specific research questions that focus on:

  1. the implementation and impact of programs assisted under IDEA in addressing developmental and academic outcomes for children with disabilities,
  2. identification for early intervention and special education,
  3. early intervention and special education services, and
  4. early intervention and special education personnel.

Studies supported in FFY 2016 (Oct. 1, 2015, through Sept. 30, 2016) that contribute to the national assessment are described in Section VI.


Appendix A presents the numbers and percentages of the resident population represented by the infants and toddlers birth through age 2 served under IDEA, Part C, in 2015 in each state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the four outlying areas (American Samoa, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the Virgin Islands) and children ages 3 through 5 served under IDEA, Part B, and students ages 6 through 21 served under IDEA, Part B, in 2015 in each state, the District of Columbia, BIE schools, Puerto Rico, the four outlying areas, and the three freely associated states (the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of Palau, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands). It also presents the number of children served in each state, the District of Columbia, BIE schools, Puerto Rico, the four outlying areas, and the three freely associated states, by race/ethnicity.

Appendix B presents information about the children ages 3 through 5 and students ages 6 through 9 served under IDEA, Part B, under the category of developmental delay.§ Exhibits B-1 and B-2 provide data on the percentages of resident populations in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico represented by the children ages 3 through 5 and students ages 6 through 9 served under IDEA, Part B, who were reported under the category of developmental delay, respectively, in each year, 2006 through 2015. Exhibit B-3 identifies whether each state, the District of Columbia, BIE schools, Puerto Rico, the four outlying areas, and the three freely associated states reported any children ages 3 through 5 or any students ages 6 through 9 under the developmental delay category in 2015.

Appendix B Footnote

§ This descriptor and other section 618 data descriptors in this report are italicized within exhibits, text, and notes to clarify that the reference is to a grouping of data.

Appendix C presents state-level information on the number of students who received coordinated early intervening services (CEIS) and number and percentage of LEAs and educational service agencies (ESAs) that were required to use 15 percent of IDEA sections 611 and 619 funds for CEIS due to significant disproportionality or that voluntarily used up to 15 percent of IDEA sections 611 and 619 funds for CEIS. In addition, state-level data are presented on the number and percentage of LEAs and ESAs that met the IDEA, Part B, requirements under 34 Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) section 300.600(a)(2) and had an increase in IDEA, Part B, section 611 allocations and took the maintenance of effort (MOE) reduction pursuant to IDEA section 613(a)(2)(C) in school year 2014–15.

 (Found in Footnotes) The year in the title reflects the U.S. Department of Education’s target year for submitting the report to Congress. The most current data in this report were collected from July 2014 through December 2015. These data have been available to the public prior to their presentation in this report. Subsequent references to this report and previously published annual reports will be abbreviated as the “XX Annual Report to Congress”; they will not include “on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.”

(Found in Footnotes) Section 618 data consist of:

  1. the number of infants and toddlers served under IDEA, Part C; the settings in which they receive program services; information on the transition at age 3 out of Part C; and dispute resolution information, and
  2. the number of children and students served under IDEA, Part B; the environments in which they receive education; their participation in and performance on state assessments; information on their exiting special education services; the personnel employed to provide educational services to them; disciplinary actions that affect them; and dispute resolution information.

§ (Found in Appendix B) This descriptor and other section 618 data descriptors in this report are italicized within exhibits, text, and notes to clarify that the reference is to a grouping of data.

Department issues Q&A on Free Appropriate Public Education following Supreme Court decision

WASHINGTON (Dec. 7, 2017)—The Department’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) released a Question-and-Answer document addressing the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District Re-1, which clarified the scope of the free appropriate public education (FAPE) requirements in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

The Court held that “to meet its substantive obligation under the IDEA, a school must offer [a child] an [individualized education program] IEP reasonably calculated to enable a child to make progress appropriate in light of the child’s circumstances.”

The Q-&-A document provides an overview of the facts and issue in the case, a discussion of the IDEA FAPE requirements and includes questions addressing implementation considerations.

OSERS is interested in receiving comments from families, teachers, administrators, and other stakeholders to assist us in identifying implementation questions and best practices that may inform future guidance on this decision.

OSERS will use the comments to identify implementation questions and best practices that may inform future department guidance on IDEA and FAPE.

Those interested in submitting comments should email OSERS at EndrewF@ed.gov.

View U.S. Department of Education Press Release.

View Questions and Answers (Q&A) on U. S. Supreme Court Case Decision Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District Re-1.

Download Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District Case Q&A (PDF, 561KB).