Celebrating Hispanic-Serving Institutions

In celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month, it’s important to recognize the contributions of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and the remarkable impact they have had on communities across the country. The Hispanic-Serving Institutions designation was first created in the Higher Education Amendments of 1992. The statutory requirement for an institution to qualify as an HSI is that it must be an eligible public or private non-profit institution of higher education and have the enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic students. This requirement ensures that HSIs are supporting first-generation and/or low-income Hispanic students.

With over 60 million Hispanics  in the United States, and 3.6 million of them postsecondary students, here are some fast facts about HSIs.

HSIs have been critical to making the promise of a postsecondary education a reality for many Hispanic students and to increasing the number of certificates and degrees attained by Hispanic students across the country. They have helped provide important pathways for in-demand jobs, apprenticeships, internships, fellowships, mentorships, and work-based learning initiatives through public-private partnerships and have partnered with their local school districts to offer dual enrollment programs. These and many more innovative contributions of HSIs are worth celebrating not just during Hispanic Heritage Month, but all year long.

Summary of the Initial Meeting of the President’s Advisory Commission on Hispanic Prosperity

This week, the President’s White House Hispanic Prosperity Commission convened to tackle issues related to the Hispanic community such as school choice, reopening schools, access to capital and reducing barriers to Hispanic small business. President Trump’s Executive Order on the White House Hispanic Prosperity Initiative established the Commission to advise the President on the best ways to increase access to educational and economic opportunities for Hispanic American students, workers, and communities.

The Commission addressed the importance of having the option of reopening schools for Hispanic students in a statement: “We call for the choice of educational options for Latino students across America, including in-person schooling, commensurate with all relevant CDC and other health guidelines. We Hispanic commissioners know that Latino children in America are disproportionately harmed by the lack of options that best fit their educational style, and their families should be given the right to choose how to educate their children.” For more information, click here.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and Small Business Administrator Jovita Carranza addressed the Commission and shared the importance of educational and economic opportunities for the Hispanic community.

The Commission created subcommittees to focus on educational opportunities, access to capital and identifying regulation barriers to Hispanic small businesses, EEOC accessibility, and identifying federal resources for the Hispanic community.

From Left: Commissioner Robert “Bob” Unanue, Commissioner Alfredo Ortiz, Commissioner Steve Cortes, Special Assistant to the President Dr. Andrea Ramirez, Commissioner Jose Fuentes Agostini, Commission Chairman John Sanchez, Commissioner Mario Rodriguez, Deputy Assistant to the President Jennifer Korn, Commissioner Jesus Marquez, Commissioner David Olivencia, Commissioner Casandra Garcia Meade, and Senior Advisor to the White House Hispanic Prosperity Initiative Emmanuel Caudillo

Hispanic Commission calls for choice of educational options for Latino students across America

At their initial meeting this week, the President’s Advisory Commission on Hispanic Prosperity released the following statement:

“We call for the choice of educational options for Latino students across America, including in-person schooling, commensurate with all relevant CDC and other health guidelines.

We Hispanic commissioners know that Latino children in America are disproportionately harmed by the lack of options that best fit their educational style, and their families should be given the right to choose how to educate their children.”

President’s Advisory Commission on Hispanic Prosperity

Appointed by the President, the Commission is composed of outstanding individuals with relevant experience or subject matter expertise in promoting educational opportunities and economic success in the Hispanic American community.