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Honoring MLK Jr.’s Drum Major Legacy: Innovative Pathways to Success

 

2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Drum Major Innovation Service Award

The Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans hosted the Martin Luther King Jr.’s Drum Major Legacy program to honor members of communities across the nation who have upheld Dr. King’s legacy innovatively through their extraordinary every day acts of service towards youth and education. Nineteen awardees including educators and community members received the 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Drum Major Innovation Service Award at a special ceremony at the U.S. Department of Education headquarters in Washington, DC on April 3, 2018, the day before the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination in Memphis, Tennessee.

While honoring the legacy of Dr. King, Secretary DeVos offered many thanks and congratulations to the award recipients for their contributions to youth and their communities

Congratulations to the following awardees:

Angel H. Malone, Principal, Orangeburg, SC
Angelique Maury, Director, Baring House Crisis Nursery Program at Youth Service Inc.
Asma Hanif, Community leader, Baltimore, MD
Bishop Larry Camel, New Birth Missionary Baptist Church in Saginaw, MI
Dr. Jim Rollins, Superintendent, Springdale School District, Springdale, AR
Dr. Marche Fleming-Randle, Vice President for Diversity and Community Engagement, Wichita State University
Dr. Nicole Steele, Founder and Executive Director of Diamond in the Rough
Dr. Noor Fatima, Professor at International Islamic University,
DuShun Levelle Scarbrough, Sr., Executive Director, Arkansas Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission
Emily Lincoln, Sophomore and Community Leader
Karen Bell, Retired Army Veteran
Lady Shirley Camel, New Birth Missionary Baptist Church in Saginaw, MI
Lynne Gassant, Founder of Scholar Career Coaching
Oscar Hawkins, Kids First Awareness 21st Century Community Learning Center
Cindy Hawkins, Kids First Awareness 21st Century Community Learning Center
Rev. Jesse C. Turner, National Alliance of Faith and Justice (NAFJ) of the PEN or PENCIL (POP) Initiative

2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award Application

Note: This award is not part of the President’s Volunteer Service Award (PVSA). If you are nominating someone else please notify that person in advance.
Examples of volunteer work:

• Helping students develop skills that will prepare them to be informed, thoughtful and productive individuals and citizens.

• Helping improve student educational outcomes in STEM or propel students towards STEM careers.

• Helping to support literacy skills for students.

• Help personalize learning for students.

• Mentoring or tutoring toward preparing students with skills needed for the workforce.

• Volunteering at a faith-based or community based organization to provide support and services to students and families.

Eligibility requirements:

• Minimum of two years of volunteer community service (must be unpaid) within the last three years that has focused on providing educational experiences for students in an innovative way; Examples include: leading through outreach, mission-driven service, volunteerism, ministry, etc.

• A minimum of two (more are encouraged) forms of supporting documentation (no more than a year old) of the nominee’s contribution to their community (i.e. Written testimonial provided by a colleague or recipient of the service work; links to newspaper articles; picture/video documentation of the service work). If you are nominating yourself, you must submit a written testimonial provided by a colleague or recipient of the service work and other supporting documents. Please email these supporting documents to EdPartners@Ed.Gov subject: Supporting Documents.

Note: You must complete all required fields for your application to be considered.

• What service work did the nominee perform?
• How did this work serve the community? What needs did it address?
• What was the outcome of the service work? Who benefited? How did they benefit?
• What makes this work innovative?