Request for Comments on WIOA Performance Information Collection

The Departments of Labor and Education are soliciting comments concerning a collection of data that will be used to demonstrate that specified performance levels under the WIOA have been achieved. The WIOA Performance Management, Information, and Reporting System fulfills requirements in section 116(d) (1) of the act for the development of report templates for 1) the State Performance Report for WIOA’s six core programs; 2) the Local Area Performance Report for the three Title I programs; and 3) the Eligible Training Provider Report for the Title I Adult and Dislocated Worker programs.

A copy of the proposed Information Collection Request with applicable supporting documentation may be accessed at by selecting Docket ID number ETA-2015-0007. The comment period is open for 60 days and closes on September 21, 2015. Any comments not received through the processes outlined in the Federal Register will not be considered by the departments.

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Acting Assistant Secretary, OCTAE

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act – One-Year Anniversary

Last Wednesday marked one year since the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was signed into law by President Obama. OCTAE sent a special anniversary message to our State Directors. That message included a video from Secretaries Duncan and Perez who jointly commemorated the anniversary of WIOA’s passage. We wanted to share these messages with all of you.

Integrating Employability Skills: A Framework for All Educators

On Thursday, July 16, 2015, the College and Career Readiness and Success (CCRS) Center, in partnership with the Center on Great Teachers and Leaders (GTL) and RTI International, released Integrating Employability Skills: A Framework for All Educators. This professional learning module—a collection of customizable, train-the-trainer materials—is designed to support regional comprehensive centers, state educational agency staff, adult education programs, and state regional centers in building their knowledge and capacity to integrate and prioritize employability skills at the state and local levels.

The module includes PowerPoint slides, handouts, a sample agenda, a workbook, tools for individuals or state work groups, and a facilitator’s guide designed to accomplish the following:

  • Introduce participants to the Employability Skills Framework and its importance
  • Connect employability skills with other education initiatives
  • Provide tools and strategies to prioritize employability skills at all levels

For more information about the module and to view the CCRS Center’s guidelines for use, please visit their website here.

To learn more about the Employability Skills Framework itself, please visit its homepage.

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

FCCLA Celebrates 70 Years

The Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) held its 2015 National Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. from July 6th– 9th  at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

The Opening General Session featured an introduction by Mark Mitsui, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Community Colleges at OCTAE. He recognized three FCCLA initiatives: “FCCLA at the Table,” through which members pledged to share a sit-down meal with their families, and more than 70,000 such meals were pledged; participation in the First Lady’s “Let’s Move!” campaign; and their involvement with food bank volunteering efforts, demonstrated by the more than 1,100 pounds of non-perishable food items collected at the conference and donated to local charity, Food For Others.

To promote the conference theme, Together We are Healthy, FCCLA members danced on the Capitol lawn.

To promote the conference theme, Together We are Healthy, FCCLA members danced on the Capitol lawn.

FCCLA also practiced the “Gimme 5 Dance”–made famous by the First Lady’s appearance on the Ellen DeGeneres Show– in preparation for their visit to the Capitol Building on Wednesday morning. Gimme 5 is the latest initiative in the First Lady’s “Let’s Move!” program to fight childhood obesity, which coincides with the FCCLA National Leadership Conference’s theme of “Together We Are Healthy.”

The conference drew more than 7,700 students, advisers, and alumni from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in their signature red jackets to celebrate and connect with each other.

After the singing the national anthem and cheering for the presentation of state flags, students were addressed by their National Officers, the FCCLA Executive Director Sandy Spavone, and Muriel Bowser, Mayor of the District of Columbia, among others.

FCCLA student members rally in Washington, DC to celebrate FCCLA 70th year.

FCCLA student members rally in Washington, DC to celebrate FCCLA’s 70th year as an organization.

FCCLA dates back to 1945 when it operated as the Future Homemakers of America before merging with the New Homemakers of America (NHA) and Home Economics Related Occupations (HERO). Student members participate in CTE programs at their high schools and have the opportunity to compete in a wide variety of events at regional meetings.

On July 8th, Laura Taylor, 2014-15 National President, announced through Twitter that #2015NLC is the number 3 trending hashtag on Instagram. Another student member tweeted, “I love FCCLA Conferences. It’s like a 7,500 family reunion.” For more information about FCCLA, please visit its website here.

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

Department of Energy Hosts Mentoring Cafes in STEM Career Initiative

This article is cross-posted on the Department of Energy’s website.

What career are you thinking about that you might’ve not thought about before?

“Science engineering”

What did you learn today?

“To never give up because nothing is impossible, so put your skills to the test.”

Based on your visit today, has your interest in science, technology, engineering or mathematics increased?

“Yes,” from over 30 participants.

These were just some of the responses of 40 middle school girls from Tampa Public Housing Authority who got a glimpse of what it’s like to work in science, technology, engineering and mathematics — or STEM — at the Museum of Science and Industry on Saturday, June 13.

As part of the Department of Energy’s STEM Mentoring Café program, these middle schoolers spent the day touring the museum, engaging in hands-on activities, and meeting real scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians. The theme of the day was STEM Careers and Connections to Climate Change, empowering girls to get sparked by STEM, stick with it, and set their minds to their future.

To help inspire and motivate these girls, STEM professionals from NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Lowry Park Zoo, Verizon, and Tampa Electric Company volunteered their time to explore STEM with them. These mentors helped to bring to life the impact that STEM research has on everyday life and could have on these students’ futures. Annie Caraccio, a chemical engineer at NASA, spent her time providing examples of how the work of engineers at NASA has led to several inventions — including the microwave. Other mentors encouraged the girls to continue their education and seek out opportunities.

The Museum of Science and Industry also captivated the girls’ attention and sparked their curiosity. “I wish I could come back every day!” one wrote. “The museum is a place where you can find out what you want to do when you grow up,” said another.

STEM Mentoring Cafes are being launched around the country, and programs like this one can be the inspiration girls need to pursue STEM more seriously, such as through enrolling in a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program in high school or pursuing a degree in a STEM field in college.

Click on these links to read more about the Mentoring Cafes and to visit the Department of Energy’s original post.

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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

Making a Shift in the Public Workforce System

This article is cross-posted on the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services website, the Department of Labor’s WIOA website, and the Department of Health and Human Services’ website.

Today, July 1, 2015, marks the day that many of the provisions of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) take effect. This new law has the potential to make a tremendous difference for tens of millions of workers, jobseekers and students across this country. WIOA’s transformation of our publicly-funded workforce system means that all of us—federal and state partners, governments, non-profits and educational and training institutions, must be pressing for innovations to ensure:

  • the needs of business and workers drive our workforce solutions
  • one-stop centers, also known as American Job Centers (AJCs) provide excellent customer service to both jobseekers and employers and focus on continuous improvement; and
  • the workforce system supports strong regional economies and plays an active role in community and economic development.

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Acting Assistant Secretary, OCTAE

Leveraging Local Partnerships to Support Immigrant Integration

June is Immigrant Heritage Month. In recognition of the work the adult education community is doing to support the diverse linguistic and cultural assets of immigrants, OCTAE is featuring the following blog by Nancy Fritz, Assistant Coordinator at the Rhode Island Family Literacy Initiative.

My journey in adult education began in 1986 when I signed up as an adult literacy volunteer with Literacy Volunteers of America. With a longstanding interest in languages and having previously taught high school civics and history, I immediately loved it and I knew I wanted to work on the field of adult education and enrolled in some graduate classes. Like many ESOL instructors, I pieced together my work through part-time positions for several adult education agencies including at a public library.  Luckily, I was able to obtain a full-time position at one agency as a teacher and then as an Education Director.

For the past 4 years, I have worked for the Rhode Island Family Literacy Initiative (RIFLI). RIFLI was founded sixteen years ago when libraries began receiving increasing requests from recent immigrants for English as a Second Language (ESL) services. The Providence Public Library (PPL) responded by implementing a family literacy program at one branch library. The program has grown significantly since then and RIFLI now provides classes in six library systems, in the public schools to the parents of children, in businesses for employees, and in our local One Stop employment center.  We offer ESL, Citizenship, Digital Literacy, Transition to College and Career, Math, and Conversation classes.  RIFLI serves approximately 300 adults per year.

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White House Hosts “Celebrating Innovations in Career and Technical Education”

As part of her Reach Higher initiative, the First Lady will deliver remarks at the Celebrating Innovations in Career and Technical Education (CTE) event, hosted by the White House in partnership with the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education. In her remarks, Mrs.Obama will celebrate students and educators for their work connecting the classroom to real-life career opportunities.

Students and educators selected through a competitive process run by the Association for Career and Technical Education, as well as schools selected by the National Association of State Directors of Career and Technical Education, will attend this event in South Court Auditorium. Together, these individuals and programs represent a wide range of accomplishment in the field that is preparing students for success in school and beyond. Over the course of the day, the White House will showcase student projects and lead discussions with education leaders, business and industry representatives, and policy makers on how the best CTE programs can be replicated and expanded.

This event follows the release of an Executive Order expanding the United States Presidential Scholars program to establish a new category of outstanding scholars in CTE. In case you missed it, additional information about the E.O. can be found here.

This event is open press and will be livestreamed at


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Olivia Wood is a summer intern for the College and Career Transitions branch of the Division of Academic and Technical Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

Workforce Innovation Fund Grants Now Available Through the Department of Labor

The Workforce Innovation Fund (WIF), launched in 2011, supports service delivery innovation at the systems level and promotes long-term improvements in the performance of the public workforce system, including strengthening evidence based program strategies through evaluation and the scaling of best practices. The 2015 WIF application heavily encourages workforce agencies to team up with at least two of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) core program partners from among Wagner-Peyser Employment Service; the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act Program; and the Vocational Rehabilitation Program authorized under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Colleagues in the federally funded adult education community should consider leveraging this application to their benefit, including developing stronger and lasting partnerships with workforce investment boards (WIBs).

Earlier this month, the Department of Labor announced the availability of $34 million for the third round of grants that will support 6-8 grantees in the amounts of $3 to $6 million with the goal of coordinating and aligning resources across the federal government and with state and local partners. Interested parties should pursue one of the following strategies:

  • Enhance strategic collaboration and coordination of workforce development programs to align services with employer needs and local economic development activities and be more effective;
  • Strengthen the quality of services to individuals and employers at American Job Centers; and
  • Promote accountability, data-driven decision-making and customer choice.

Innovation like this already exists among our stakeholders. One such example, Silicon Valley’s Alliance for Language Learners’ Integration, Education, and Success (ALLIES), was highlighted by the Department in the February 2015 report, Making Skills Everyone’s Business. ALLIES boasts three workforce boards, 10 community colleges, three adult education schools, human services agencies, employers, community-based organizations, unions, and the San Mateo Hispanic Chamber of Commerce as members of a network that uses a collective impact approach to empower immigrants in the region by helping them access the appropriate services that will connect them to and help them advance in family-sustaining careers. The current WIF application will encourage more opportunities for cross-core program partnerships such as ALLIES.

Grant applications are due by July 23, 2015. Information on applying for this grant is now available.

Interested applicants are encouraged to visit to learn more about the Workforce Innovation Fund, and to find tools and resources to support application development. A tutorial for on applying for grants is also available online.

Executive Order Elevates Career and Technical Education

Tens of thousands of practitioners and policymakers across our country have worked tirelessly over the last few years to ensure that “vocational” education–as our parents knew it–is over. Catalyzed by the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, the Administration’s 2012 Blueprint for Transforming Career and Technical Education, and the work of major national organizations such as National Association for State Directors of Career and Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc) and the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE), there has been tremendous growth in availability of high-quality “career and technical” education (CTE) programs to equip students for success in postsecondary education and careers in our global economy.

These high-quality CTE programs are exactly what we want to support in a reauthorized Perkins bill. Programs that are aligned to labor market demand. Programs that require collaboration among secondary, postsecondary, business/industry, and other key partners. Programs that are accountable for academic, technical, and employability outcomes for students, based on common definitions and clear metrics for performance. Programs that capitalize on innovations in state and local policies and practice. And, programs that assure full access and equity by students regardless of background or circumstances.

Despite our efforts and the availability of high-quality CTE programs, there remains an unfortunate stigma surrounding CTE. Too many students do not know about these rigorous pathways into postsecondary education and a well-paying job or rewarding career. Too many parents think about CTE using their own experiences with “shop class” as a reference. Too many members of the general public who have yet to learn that CTE is not only a viable, rigorous option, but a path into the middle class.

This Administration is committed to doing its part to change the perceptions of CTE. On Monday, June 22, President Obama signed an Executive Order expanding the U. S. Presidential Scholars Program to include students who demonstrate scholarship, ability, and accomplishment in CTE. This Executive Order builds on great collaboration between the executive and legislative branches of government, and reflects the hard work of teams of individuals at the White House, on the Hill, and in the Department. We are extremely grateful for this effort. It moves CTE out of the periphery and raises it to a level of federally-recognized prestige on par with traditional academic pathways and the arts.

Photo of Johan Uvin
Posted by
Acting Assistant Secretary, OCTAE