Call for Ideas to Help Shape Federal Immigrant and Refugee Integration Strategy

Contribute to this Call for Ideas from the White House Task Force on New Americans!  The goal of the Task Force is to develop a federal immigrant integration strategy that allows new Americans to contribute to society to their fullest potential and bring new Americans together with their receiving communities to strengthen communities.

OCTAE’s programs are often the first educational stop for many immigrant and refugee families. Our practitioners can inform the Task Force with real-life stories and examples of specific actions and supports that could help immigrants and refugees integrate into their communities and for their communities to welcome them. The Task Force needs to hear from you.

In a White House blog post, the Task Force posted this Call for Ideas to help shape the focus of the federal immigration and refugee integration strategy and created a specific email account, NewAmericans@who.eop.gov, for gathering stakeholder ideas.  Please send your ideas, big or small, to this email by February 9, 2015

 

After Finals, Foster Youth Students Face a Much More Difficult Test

As winter break unwinds and college students are at home for the holidays, many homeless and foster care students find themselves scrambling for somewhere to live until classes resume in January. College campuses traditionally close down for winter break. For these vulnerable students their college campus is their home, their community and a primary source of security. While their peers are headed home to see family and catch up with old friends, many of these young people are faced with bleak prospects for the holiday season.

These vulnerable youth face the same struggles as other young people trying to maintain good grades, navigating social peer groups, and planning their futures, but they face the additional burdens associated with little to no adult guidance or support. Fortunately, higher education professionals across our nation have begun to tackle the unique issues faced by homeless and foster care students. They are developing comprehensive strategies to address the most persistent barriers these students face; not just during the holiday season, but all year long.

“Higher education can be the silver bullet to achieving long-term health, housing, and economic security. And for young people who have already overcome so much adversity just to earn a seat in a college classroom, they should have every opportunity—inside and outside of the classroom—to succeed” says Jasmine Hayes, Policy Director for the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness. “Ensuring these youth have a safe, stable place to call home in-between semesters is critical. Keeping student housing open and available for youth experiencing homelessness during semester breaks is an effective approach.”

Programs in states like Colorado and North Carolina have implemented Single Points of Contact (SPOCs) in their postsecondary institutions which provide these students access to designated college administrators who are committed to helping them to successfully navigate the college-going process. States and higher education institutions across the country are also working to address the issues these students face, including

  • access to higher education opportunities and financial support;
  • navigation of the college-going process, including financial aid and service referral processes; and
  • basic needs like employment, housing and food.

These efforts are ensuring these most vulnerable students reach their highest potential.

Colleges can play a pivotal role in supporting the academic success of these students. Just ask for foster youth, Alain Datcher. “Entering college as a first time student was a daunting experience. It was a mixture of culture shock, academic rigor and rapid growth. I don’t believe I would have succeeded without the support network I had in one woman – Tamara Malone. She was a mentor, academic advisor, dean and more in one caring, compassionate woman.” When asked how he thought his experience could translate for other students who are homeless or in foster care he replied, “Proximity will define opportunity for these young people. Having a close, approachable, and tangible support network will make the difference. It did in my college education at Biola University. I’ll be earning a Master’s of Public Policy degree in April. Having one caring, single point of contact in Tamra is a big reason why I will.”

When educators act, they change lives. If you know of a foster youth student in your institution, be proactive and reach out. It can make all the difference. Find out more at http://findyouthinfo.gov/.

Guest bloggers: Annie Blackledge, Casey Family Programs Senior Fellow with the U.S. Department of Education, and Johan Uvin, Acting Assistant Secretary for OCTAE.

Recap: Performance Partnership Pilots (P3) Webinars with Tribal Leaders

by Johan E. Uvin, Acting Assistant Secretary, OCTAE, U.S. Department of Education

On Thursday, August 21st and Tuesday, August 26th, the Department of Education, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Labor, the Corporation for National and Community Services, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Office of Management and Budget and the White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education co-hosted tribal outreach webinars on Performance Partnership Pilots (P3). These national calls had attendance from various tribal leaders and provided an opportunity for the tribal communities serving disconnected youth to learn about the goals of P3 and current activities to launch the program this fall.

It is essential that we develop solutions to reconnect the more than 5 million youth, nationwide, who are not employed nor in school to help them on a path to post-secondary education and careers, and to ensure we have a skilled and talented workforce that can meet the needs of employers both now and in the future. We know that for many American Indian & Alaska Native youth, the challenges they face are great. American Indian and Alaska Native students continue to lag behind their peers on national assessments, account for the highest dropout rate of any racial or ethnic population, and hold a dramatically lower share of baccalaureate degrees than the rest of the population.

According to the National Congress of American Indians, over 40 percent of American Indian and Alaska Native people are under the age of 24. The P3 tribal outreach calls are an extension of the Administration’s commitment to strengthen the nation to nation relationship with tribal governments in order to improve the quality of life for all American Indians and Alaska Natives. In partnership with tribal nations, the Administration continues to identify and promote critical reforms that prepare American Indian and Alaska Native students for leadership in their communities and success in the 21st century.

About Performance Partnership Pilots

The 2014 Consolidated Appropriations Bill provides authority to the Departments of Education, Labor, and Health and Human Services, along with the Corporation for National and Community Service, to enter into up to 10 Performance Partnership agreements with state, local, or Federally-recognized tribal governments that give them additional flexibility in using discretionary funds across multiple Federal programs. States, localities, and Federally-recognized tribal governments that seek to participate in these pilots will commit to achieve significant improvements for disconnected youth in educational, employment, and other key outcomes in exchange for this new flexibility.

The primary focus of the pilots will be providing disconnected youth with more effective supports to climb ladders of opportunity. The pilots will support innovative partnerships across local governments, non-profits, businesses and other sectors. In some cases, pilots will help propel collaborative and evidence-based work that jurisdictions already have underway. Finally, the pilots as a group will provide a valuable opportunity to learn whether this model for Federal partnership improves outcomes on the ground, and how it could be extended to other Federal programs.

Additional information on P3 can be found by visiting this link. Questions regarding P3 can be sent to disconnectedyouth@omb.eop.gov.

 

 

Federal Agencies to Host Live Stream Dialogue on Career Pathways

On Tuesday, September 23, 2014, the U.S. Departments of Labor, Education and Health and Human Services will host a National Dialogue on Career Pathways.  Federal agency leaders from each Department will provide opening remarks on the impact of building effective career pathways can have on our nation’s workforce system.  In addition, the Dialogue will highlight strategies and lessons learned from business leaders, state and local practitioners and national policy leaders.   Among the featured speakers will be

  • Portia Wu, Assistant Secretary for Labor’s Employment and Training Administration
  • Johan Uvin, Acting Assistant Secretary for Education’s Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education
  • Mark Greenburg, Acting Assistance Secretary for Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families
  • David L. Casey, Vice President for Workforce Strategies and Chief Diversity Officer at CVS Caremark
  • Maura Banta, Director of Global Citizenship Initiatives at IBM USA

National stakeholders representing business, organized labor, education, workforce and health and human services agencies are encouraged to host events in conjunction with the broadcast.   To help organize the event, a national Viewing Party Guide is now available.  Leading career pathways states and local areas, such as Colorado, Kansas, and Charlotte, NC will be highlighted as well as innovative career pathways practices from organizations like Instituto del Progreso Latino in Chicago, IL and Wider Opportunities for Women.

The National Dialogue will be broadcast via live stream beginning at 9:00 AM EDT and end at 4:00 PM EDT.  Before and during the event, you are encouraged to post questions on Twitter using the hashtag #careerpathways. The federal team will monitor your questions on Twitter and respond to them from the Labor Department Twitter account (@USDOL) during the event.

Sign up now to get email alerts from the new Career Pathways Exchange, a project funded by OCTAE to support states’ work on career pathways.  This email-based information service will connect interested stakeholders with career pathways-related resources, news, and events from a wide network of federal agencies and partner organizations. Members can select to receive email digests on their topics of interest, including: Building Cross-agency Partnerships, Identifying Sector/Engaging Employers, Designing Programs, Identifying Funding Needs, Aligning Policy and Programs, and Measuring System Change and Evaluations.

Suggested Social Media Posts for the National Dialogue:

Pre-event post: Join @USDOL @usedgov and @HHSGov on 9-23 @ 9:00 AM ET for a live stream plenary on #careerpathways.

Pre-event post: On 9-23 @ 9:00 AM ET, @USDOL @usedgov and @HHSGov will speak live about job-driven #careerpathways. Don’t miss it!

Day-of post: Join business leaders @cvscaremarkfyi’s David Casey and @IBM’s Maura Banta today via live stream @ National Dialogue! #careerpathways

Day-of post:  America, let’s talk about #careerpathways today!  Share your thoughts with us @USDOL @usedgov and @HHSGov.  Join the Dialogue.

Addressing the Challenges of Developmental Education

On August 12, leaders from across the higher education, philanthropic and non-profit communities gathered to discuss the research, evidence, and challenges associated with reinventing developmental education. Secretary Duncan framed the developmental education challenge as both a completion and equity issue, saying, “As you know, we can no longer use the traditional approach to developmental education, which has been a long sequence of remedial classes that do not count toward a degree and few students are able to complete.”

Read ED’s Homeroom Blog. where Deputy Assistant Secretary Mark Mitsui recaps the meeting and highlights how the White House is building momentum around addressing developmental education challenges.

Call for Research Papers Using PIAAC Data

EXTENDED CALL! New deadline for papers announced.

OCTAE is collaborating with the U.S. National Institutes of Health, specifically the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child and Human Development (NICHD) and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), to sponsor a call for research papers on the relationship of education and skills to public health for adults and their families, particularly for those most at risk for poor educational, economic, and health outcomes. This collaboration reflects a shared commitment to increasing the evidence base for the work that these agencies perform and to making that evidence freely available for all.

The theme of the call is: Improving the Lives of Adults and Families: Identifying Individual and Systems-level Factors Relating Education, Health, Civic Engagement, and Economic Well-being. This effort leverages and extends the recent Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on U.S. Health in International Perspective as well as the recently released Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) cross-national, population-representative dataset, the Survey of Adult Skills, part of the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), to hone in on issues specific to the U.S. and allow for rich international comparisons.

Note that the U.S. PIAAC Background Questionnaire includes questions on health status, health insurance coverage, sources of information about health issues, and preventive health practices (based on age and gender). Online learning modules for the PIAAC dataset are available.

OCTAE, NICHD, and OBSSR plan to cover the publication fees associated with a select number of initial publications for this Collection. Authors interested in applying for financial consideration by these groups should submit a preliminary draft paper for funding consideration by September 15, 2015 to brett.miller@nih.gov.

PLOS icon, a stylized atom as a planet

PLOS icon

See the full Call for Papers on the Public Library of Science (PLOS) blog site. PLOS is a peer-reviewed, highly competitive, open source journal that publishes online, freely-available articles related to science, medicine, and health. The Collection is essentially an open-ended special issue where related articles can be easily grouped. The Collection will stay open for additional articles past the initial deadline for consideration.

Upskilling in Order to be Ready to Work

Providing access to foundation skills for the 24 million working Americans who have low skills is acknowledged as a cornerstone in the Vice President’s Ready to Work report, issued on July 22, 2014. Jeffery Zients, Director of the National Economic Council, and Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education, co-authored a blog highlighting the importance of on ramps, career pathways, and on the job training for this population. The article is posted on the White House site and ED’s Homeroom site.

The recent passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act along with the executive actions in the Vice President’s report include significant changes and lay the foundation for the transformation of adult learning in our country.

Please see the article and share it through your networks to raise awareness and urgency of the importance of ensuring all Americans are ready to work.

President Obama Signs Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Into Law

On July 22, President Barack Obama signed the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) into law. The signing ceremony was a showcase for the importance of national workforce education and development to economic recovery. It included the release of Ready to Work: Job-Driven Training and American Opportunity, a federal-wide effort to ensure “that federally funded training programs are singularly focused on getting more Americans ready to work with marketable skills.”

WIOA will become effective on July 1, 2015, the first full program year (PY) after its enactment.  However, the act includes several provisions that become effective on other dates.  For example, Governors must submit Unified State Plans pertaining to workforce investment programs, adult education and vocational rehabilitation to the Secretary of Labor on March 1, 2016. In addition, the WIA performance accountability section remains in effect for PY 2015, with the new WIOA performance accountability provisions taking effect at the start of PY 2016 on July 1, 2016.

Following the signing, both the departments of Labor and Education announced WIOA implementation resources and outreach efforts to their stakeholders. Bookmark the OCTAE WIOA Reauthorization website of resources for information on the act and links to the resource websites of the department of Labor and vocational rehabilitation.

New IES Partnership Research Grants Announced

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) and the National Center for Education Research (NCES) awarded eighteen new research grants under the Partnerships and Collaborations Focused on Problems of Practice or Policy program (CFDA 84.305h).  In FY 2014, the Institute competed three topics under this program: Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships in Education Research, Continuous Improvement Research in Education, and Evaluation of State and Local Education Programs and Policies. The topics support collaborations between research institutions and state or local education agencies on education issues of high priority for the education agency.  Total spending for these awards is approximately $18.6 million. Click on the grant titles below to learn more:

Awarded in the Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships in Education Research Topic

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Comments Welcome on New Grant Priorities for Vocational Rehabilitation

The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services proposes two priorities under the Capacity Building Program for Traditionally Underserved Populations. These priorities would:

  • Establish a new vocational rehabilitation (VR) training institute for the preparation of personnel in the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services (AIVRS) program.
  • Encourage applications submitted through a collaborative arrangement between a four-year institution of higher education (IHE) and a two-year community college or tribal college.

The Assistant Secretary may use these priorities for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. The Department invites comments regarding these proposed priorities. The purpose of this action is to improve the provision of VR services to, and the employment outcomes of, American Indians with disabilities. Community colleges are especially encouraged to comment on these priorities.

A Notice of Proposed Priority (NPP) was published in the Federal Register on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 and is listed as: DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Chapter III [Docket ID ED-2014-OSERS-0024; CFDA Number: 84.315C.] Capacity Building Program for Traditionally Underserved Populations–Vocational Rehabilitation Training Institute for the Preparation of Personnel in American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services Projects.

Learn more through these links to both text and PDF version of the Notice.

Comments must be received on or before Friday, July 11, 2014.

For more information please contact: Kristen Rhinehart. Telephone: (202) 245-6103 or by email: kristen.rhinehart@ed.gov.  If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1-800-877-8339.