Bullying

Hines Ward, retired NFL wide receiver and former member of the President’s Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, shares his story on bullying.

| AAPI Bullying Prevention Task Force | Bullying Awareness | Resources |

More than one-quarter of students between the ages of 12 and 18 reported being bullied at school during the 2010-2011 school year—nearly 7 million students. Some Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students face bullying and harassment based on their immigration status, such as Micronesian students whose families have recently immigrated to the continent and Hawaii. Others are bullied for the way they look, such as turbaned Sikh youth, or for their English language skills. One 2014 study found that 67% of turbaned Sikh youth in Fresno, CA, have experienced bullying or harassment. A 2012 survey found that half of the 163 Asian American New York City public school students reported experiencing some kind of bias-based harassment, compared with only 27 percent in 2009. Finally, another 2012 survey found that 50 percent of Muslim youth surveyed experienced verbal or social bullying because of their religion.

Bullying of AAPI students presents unique circumstances complicated by linguistic, cultural, and religious issues. A wide gap continues to exist between utilization of government remedies by the community and the incidence of bullying and harassment that affects AAPI students. Although advocacy groups report many incidents of bullying and harassment of AAPI students, few complaints are filed by members of the AAPI community with federal civil rights enforcement offices, and AAPI community members may face barriers to seeking other avenues for support or remediation.

AAPI Bullying Prevention Task Force

Read the AAPI Task Force’s 2014-2016 report

In November 2014, the federal government launched the Asian American and Pacific Islander Bullying Prevention Task Force in response to community concerns about bullying of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students across the country. The AAPI Task Force includes members from across the federal government, including from the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Although each of these agencies has been working to address bullying of AAPI students, the AAPI Task Force has focused and coordinated these efforts to ensure that the federal government’s response to this important issue is as effective as possible.

For two years, the AAPI Task Force has worked to help ensure that the AAPI community is aware of federal resources and remedies that are available to them, and explored and recommended solutions to address the AAPI community’s concerns. The AAPI Task Force met regularly with key community stakeholders as well as hosted 29 listening sessions with advocacy groups and community groups to learn more about the experiences of AAPI students and parents with bullying. To read the AAPI Task Force’s 2014-2016 report, visit here.

Resources

Please find a list of resources related to bullying and harassment below.

Bullying and Harassment

Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention

U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Justice

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Health Resources and Services Administration

U.S. Department of Justice

U.S. Department of Education

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

Suicide Prevention Resources

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Other Education Resources

U.S. Department of Education

U.S. Department of Justice

U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Justice

Cultural Competency and Awareness Resources

U.S. Department of Justice

U.S. Department of Education

  • Newcomer Toolkit

The Department of Education’s Newcomer Toolkit is designed to help schools support immigrants, refugees, and their families with a successful integration process. This toolkit provides information, resources and examples of effective practices that educators can use to support newcomers in our schools and communities. www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oela/new-comer-toolkit/ncomertoolkit.pdf

  • Title VI funded National Resource Centers

The Department of Education supports 100 National Resource Centers (NRC) that have expertise on world areas (Latin America, Africa, Asia, Middle East) and their less commonly taught languages (Arabic, Mandarin, Urdu, Portuguese, etc.). Currently, there are 14 Middle East National Resource Centers and 9 South Asia Centers. They have extensive resources for K-12 educators, such as teacher training programs, curricular modules and lesson plans, as well as faculty expertise.

The NRCs are national resources and are available to assist teachers/schools from any state. www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/more-633-million-awarded-colleges-and-universities-strengthen-global-competitiveness-through-international-studies-and-world-language-training